Posted by: missionventureministries | May 10, 2018

WARNING AGAINST JUDGING OTHERS – Romans 2:1-4

Therefore you have no excuse, O man, every one of you who judges. For in passing judgment on another you condemn yourself, because you, the judge, practice the very same things. We know that the judgment of God rightly falls on those who practice such things. Do you suppose, O man—you who judge those who practice such things and yet do them yourself—that you will escape the judgment of God? Or do you presume on the riches of His kindness and forbearance and patience, not knowing that God’s kindness is meant to lead you to repentance? (Romans 2:1-4)

Chapter one of Romans portrayed a deplorable moral picture of the Gentile world; evil, idolatry, sexual perversion, and debauchery of every kind.   

Now we see Paul addressing the Jews who thought that they were better than the Gentiles and were passing judgment on them. He begins to address Jews without mentioning them by name, but telling the so called moralist that: “You are just as guilty as they are!” 

While “moralist” may not indulge in gross manifestations of sin as some do, all people have thoughts, motives, and attitudes at times that displease God. Paul’s point is that even “nice sinners” who pass judgment on others stand condemned. We need to remember what the Bible tells us that: “If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us” (1 John 1:8); and that we “all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God” (Romans 3:23). 

The Jews had disguised their piety through “keeping of the Law”. If they had been honest, they would have confessed that the Law was impossible to keep and welcomed the opportunity to serve God faithfully and not in a hypocritical way. 

The Jews had accurately condemned the practices that Paul outlined in Romans chapter one, but they also practiced the things that they were condemning! This was hypocrisy of the highest order. They thanked God that they weren’t Gentiles, and then acted like the Gentiles that they looked down upon. 

We need to remember that many Jews esteem the Pharisees; Jesus knowing that the crowds faced spiritual peril if they follow these teachers in their actions reprimanded them sharply: “Woe to you, teachers of the law and Pharisees, you hypocrites! You travel over land and sea to win a single convert, and when you have succeeded, you make them twice as much a child of hell as you are” (Matthew 23:15). And He called them “snakes and a brood of vipers” in (Matthew 23:33). 

The Jews assumed that because they were God’s chosen people they would escape His wrath, just as many think today. In the Old Testament, they resisted the pronouncements and warnings of the prophets, feeling that calamity would never come, even though they were not keeping God’s commands. They felt that as children of Abraham, God somehow needed them; but they were wrong. It is so easy to feel spiritual superiority to others because of our spiritual heritage or because of our pretending to obey God. 

As Paul writes this, it is possible that he looked at his own life, since he had once been guilty of the same. Before he met Christ he was one of those proud, self-righteous people who looked down at the “bad” people around him. But when he met Jesus on his way to Damascus to kill the Christians, he began to realize through the indwelling of the Holy Spirit that he was guilty of the same sins he was judging in others. 

We all have a tendency to criticize in others the sins we excuse in ourselves. We need to be aware that our own sins to which we are blind, do not distort our judgment of others. 

We know that the judgment of God rightly falls on those who practice such things (Romans 2:2).

God judges on the basis of truth, the actual condition of the person. He judges, the way things really are, not the way they appear; and one day, we personally are going to answer to Him. 

“Do you suppose, O man—you who judge those who practice such things and yet do them yourself—that you will escape the judgment of God? Or do you presume on the riches of His kindness and forbearance and patience, not knowing that God’s kindness is meant to lead you to repentance?” (Romans 2:3-4). 

At times we might ask ourselves: Why doesn’t God judge adulterers, child-molesters, mass-murderers, pedophiles, etc.? When we should focus on ourselves and ponder, “Why hasn’t God judged me yet for the things that I have done and still have not repented of or changed?” 

God delays His judgment because He’s kind and patient and wants to give us time to repent. But if we refuse to repent, the judgment will come; we can count on it. 

Please remember that God’s kindness, tolerance, and patience is not an opportunity to sin; it’s a call to repent! Repentance means we examine our own mind and heart first before we judge anyone else. God is patient: He used Noah to call wicked people to repent; Noah preached and taught about God’s love forgiveness, wrath and judgment for hundreds of years. Not one person repented – 7 billion people became more evil and wicked every day that they lived. They were so evil and rebellious that God had to kill all of them in the flood and He saved only 8 people; Noah and his family. 

The point in these verses is made very clear: if the moralist is just as guilty as the obvious sinner how will they escape the judgment of God? At the first coming of Jesus, the loving character of God was revealed with greatest emphasis; at the second coming of Jesus, the righteous judgment of God will be revealed very clearly. 

Jesus taught: “Do not judge, or you too will be judged. For in the same way you judge others, you will be judged, and with the measure you use, it will be measured to you” (Matthew 7:1-2). 

So where do you find yourself?

 

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Responses

  1. This is a very heart stirring message. I enjoyed reading it! God bless you and amen!


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